Avoiding Anti-depressants

Avoiding Anti-depressants

When a women go back to a doctor who implanted them with mesh, complaining about pain and suffering she is usually met with a doctor who wants to continue use it when he/she does women’s pelvic surgeries, and their reaction can be quite bad to say the least. Some will act like you are stupid and don’t know what you are talking about while others take the arrogant road to let you know they know what they are doing and you should just go home and go back to your life. Worse yet most of them will tell you that you need some anti-depressants and they will willingly pull out their prescription pad and give you a drug that can make your life far worse. This way you will leave and probably never go back to them to complain about what is really going on.

Many women fall into the anti-depressant trap because they are often dealing with family members that are sick of their complaining about pain and they don’t believe them. But once on them, they find a new set of problems and they can’t live their life, not just because of one reason but because of two. So I researched to find out more about these drugs and I found a great article.

Although these drugs are generally considered to be safe by the media and amongst medical professionals and patients, a close look at the evidence suggests otherwise. Antidepressants have serious and potentially fatal adverse effects, cause potentially permanent brain damage, increase the risk of suicide and violent behavior in both children and adults, and increase the frequency and chronicity of depression. Chronic use of antidepressants also promotes dependency on drugs rather than empowering people to make positive life changes, and places a tremendous burden on healthcare systems in the U.S. and abroad – but I will discuss those issues in next week’s article.

Physiological side effects

The adverse effects of antidepressants include movement disorders, agitation, sexual dysfunction, improper bone development, improper brain development, gastrointestinal bleeding, and a variety of other lesser known problems. These are not rare events, but the most significant harm comes only after months or years of use, which leads to the false impression that antidepressants seem quite safe. Be sure to read all the comments on this article. You can read the rest for yourself

I know women who have told me about the crazy thoughts they had after taking certain drugs and how scared they were. Luckily most do recognize the problem and report to their doctors and get off them. However for some it becomes a lifestyle where over time they can’t function in life at all.

So what can you take that may help you get through the bad times while you figure out where to go to get help having the mesh removed? I found a really good Dr. Oz article that you can read that will explain alternatives to taking these drugs.

I also asked someone about her regiment for dealing with the lows of life and she told me she takes the following two natural things and they help her until she feels better.

The first one is rhodiola rosea, so I looked it up for you.

Rhodiola rosea, called rhodiola, and known as “golden root” or “arctic root” in the mountainous parts of Europe and Asia, has long been employed in Eurasian traditional medicine as a natural tonic, referred to as an “adaptogen.”

Rhodiola rosea, called rhodiola, and known as “golden root” or “arctic root” in the mountainous parts of Europe and Asia, has long been employed in Eurasian traditional medicine as a natural tonic, referred to as an “adaptogen.” Rhodiola is used to promote good health, strength, endurance and physical and mental performance. Rhodiola’s efficacy in treating mental health conditions isn’t well-known in America because the earliest studies suffered from poor controls and generalized claims and were not done in the United States or Western Europe. However, those studies and the traditional practices that spawned them have caused people to use rhodiola to treat a wide range of conditions, such as stress, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and cognitive impairment, primarily in Eastern Europe and Asia, but increasingly in the United States and around the world. Read the rest of this article here

The second one she takes is called inositol and this is what this is.

Inositol–Vitamin B8–has been found to reduce depression, hostility, tension and fatigue.

Inositol–Vitamin B8–has been found to reduce depression, hostility, tension and fatigue. It is a folk remedy for anxiety and sadness. Inositol has been shown in very small studies to be helpful for depression and panic disorder, and promising for treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders and bipolar disorder. Research has not yet shown any adjunctive benefit when inositol is used with psychotropic drugs. Inositol is a part of our diet, and supplementation seems benign. The risk is minimal. You can read more here

So before you believe that a prescription pad it the answer, try something that won’t leave you psychotic and far worse off. What have you got to lose by trying an alternative to help you get through a really bad time?



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